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Serving the Borough of Wharton since 1904

Fire Prevention

Fire Prevention in the Kitchen

  • Don’t Leave cooking unattended ---- stay in the kitchen whenever anything is cooking, and donít leave food on the stove or in your oven when you leave home.
  • Keep appliances Clean --- built up grease catches fire easily.
  • Wear close fitting sleeves when you cook ---- loose sleeves can dangle too close to stove burners and catch fire.
  • Keep flammable objects clear of the stove ---- potholders, dish towels, and curtains may catch fire if they come in contact with the burners on your stove.
  • Don’t overload electrical outlets ----- plugging too many kitchen appliances into the same electrical outlet can overload your circuit, overheat, or cause a fire.
  • Turn pot handles in ---- pot handles sticking out over the edge of your stove can be bumped in passing or grabbed by a child.
  • Heat oil slowly --- heating oil to fast and at high temperature is an easy way to start a serious kitchen fire.

If a Fire Starts in the Kitchen

  • Smother a grease fire --- never pour water onto a grease fire, if a pan of food catches fire, carefully slide a lid over the pan and turn the burner off.
  • Close the door on Microwave fires --- if anything catches fire in your microwave keep the door closed and turn off or unplug the microwave
  • Portable Fire Extinguishers --- fire extinguishers can be effective in fighting small, contained fires

 

Senior Citizen Fire Safety 

  • Plan your escape --- Know exactly what to do and where to go in case of fire.
  • Know two ways out --- of every room in your house or apartment in case smoke or flames block one way.
  • In an apartment --- be able to unlock a deadbolt quickly and easily.  Know how to get to the exit stairs.
  • In a one or two story house --- Make sure you can unlock all locks and open all windows. If you are escaping from a second story, be sure you have a save way to the ground.
  • If you are trapped --- close doors between you and smoke.  Stuff cracks and cover vents to keep smoke out. Put a wet cloth over your nose and wait at the window, signaling with a sheet or flashlight. If there is a phone in the room, call the fire department and tell them exactly where you are.
  • Test the door --- If hot, use your second way out.  If not brace your shoulder against the door and open it carefully, being ready to close it if heat or smoke rush in.
  • Get out and Stay out --- exit as quickly as you can. Go to a neighbor’s and call the fire department.  Do not even think about going back inside.
  • Get Down and Stay Low --- Smoke rises while clean air stays low, near the floor.  So crawl, maintaining contact with walls as you go to your nearest exit.
  • Stop, Drop and Roll --- If your clothing catches fire, stop where you are, drop gently to the floor or ground, cover your face with your hands, and roll.
 

Smoke Detectors

The majority of fatal home fires occur at night, when people are asleep. Instead of waking you, smoke and poisonous gases from a fire can quickly numb the senses and put you into an even deeper sleep.

Your chance of dying in a home fire is cut nearly in half if you have smoke detectors to alert you to a fire. Smoke detectors save so many lives that most states have laws requiring them in private homes.

About 86% of American homes have smoke detectors today...but that still leaves one home in seven unprotected!.

And here’s an alarming fact: One-third of the smoke detectors in American homes aren’t working! And many homes that do have smoke detector still don’t have enough to be properly protected!

Smoke detectors can save even more lives if we install them everywhere they are needed and if we keep them working.

Minimum protection requires a smoke detector outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement. On floors without bedrooms, detectors should be installed in or near living areas such as dens, living rooms, or family rooms.

Placement of smoke detectors is important, because smoke rises, mount detectors high on a wall or on the ceiling.  A wall mounted unit should be 4 to 12 inches from the ceiling.  A ceiling mounted detector should be at least 4 inches from the nearest wall.  In a room with a pitched ceiling, mount the detector on or near the ceiling highest point.

In open stairways with no doors at the top or bottom, position smoke detectors anywhere in the path of smoke moving up the stairs.  But always position smoke detectors at the bottom of enclosed stairways, such as those leading to the basement, because dead air is trapped near the door at the top of the stairway could prevent smoke from reaching the detector.

Keep detectors away from windows, doors, or forced air registers where drafts could interfere with the detector’s operation.

Test your detector by following the manufacturer’s instructions, test detectors weekly.  Remember, only a working smoke detector can protect you. Remember to change the batteries twice a year, when the time changes from daylight saving to standard, and from standard to daylight saving.

Kids Corner

Children and Fire safety are very important. 

Place a fire detector in every room in the house (and on every floor), and be sure to check their batteries at least twice a
year (when you change the clocks for Daylight Savings).

Be sure that your children know what to do if a fire breaks out in your house, like how to escape your home. Have them
come up with an escape plan showing at least two exits from every room.

Always have at least two working Fire extinguishers! They could save your families life! Be sure to test them, and
have one on each floor of your house.

Hold Fire drills in your house. Be sure that your kids have an escape plan ready in case there is a fire. Be sure to show
them every route possible for exiting your house, including their bedroom window.

Fires can break out at any time of the day or night, so it's important that your family knows how to get
out of your house as many different places as possible. It is also important that your kids know how to
stop-drop-and roll in case their clothes catch on fire. And they should keep their doors closed at night
to help keep the fire from spreading into their rooms too quickly.

US Fire Administration for Kids

Sparky the Fire Dog Home Page

 
Fire Prevention
 
 
   
 

 

   
   
 
  Home Apparatus Photos History Past Chiefs  
  Call Stats Fire Prevention Events Officers Links  
 

Serving the Borough of Wharton since 1904

Fire Prevention

Fire Prevention in the Kitchen

  • Don’t Leave cooking unattended ---- stay in the kitchen whenever anything is cooking, and donít leave food on the stove or in your oven when you leave home.
  • Keep appliances Clean --- built up grease catches fire easily.
  • Wear close fitting sleeves when you cook ---- loose sleeves can dangle too close to stove burners and catch fire.
  • Keep flammable objects clear of the stove ---- potholders, dish towels, and curtains may catch fire if they come in contact with the burners on your stove.
  • Don’t overload electrical outlets ----- plugging too many kitchen appliances into the same electrical outlet can overload your circuit, overheat, or cause a fire.
  • Turn pot handles in ---- pot handles sticking out over the edge of your stove can be bumped in passing or grabbed by a child.
  • Heat oil slowly --- heating oil to fast and at high temperature is an easy way to start a serious kitchen fire.

If a Fire Starts in the Kitchen

  • Smother a grease fire --- never pour water onto a grease fire, if a pan of food catches fire, carefully slide a lid over the pan and turn the burner off.
  • Close the door on Microwave fires --- if anything catches fire in your microwave keep the door closed and turn off or unplug the microwave
  • Portable Fire Extinguishers --- fire extinguishers can be effective in fighting small, contained fires

 

Senior Citizen Fire Safety 

  • Plan your escape --- Know exactly what to do and where to go in case of fire.
  • Know two ways out --- of every room in your house or apartment in case smoke or flames block one way.
  • In an apartment --- be able to unlock a deadbolt quickly and easily.  Know how to get to the exit stairs.
  • In a one or two story house --- Make sure you can unlock all locks and open all windows. If you are escaping from a second story, be sure you have a save way to the ground.
  • If you are trapped --- close doors between you and smoke.  Stuff cracks and cover vents to keep smoke out. Put a wet cloth over your nose and wait at the window, signaling with a sheet or flashlight. If there is a phone in the room, call the fire department and tell them exactly where you are.
  • Test the door --- If hot, use your second way out.  If not brace your shoulder against the door and open it carefully, being ready to close it if heat or smoke rush in.
  • Get out and Stay out --- exit as quickly as you can. Go to a neighbor’s and call the fire department.  Do not even think about going back inside.
  • Get Down and Stay Low --- Smoke rises while clean air stays low, near the floor.  So crawl, maintaining contact with walls as you go to your nearest exit.
  • Stop, Drop and Roll --- If your clothing catches fire, stop where you are, drop gently to the floor or ground, cover your face with your hands, and roll.
 

Smoke Detectors

The majority of fatal home fires occur at night, when people are asleep. Instead of waking you, smoke and poisonous gases from a fire can quickly numb the senses and put you into an even deeper sleep.

Your chance of dying in a home fire is cut nearly in half if you have smoke detectors to alert you to a fire. Smoke detectors save so many lives that most states have laws requiring them in private homes.

About 86% of American homes have smoke detectors today...but that still leaves one home in seven unprotected!.

And here’s an alarming fact: One-third of the smoke detectors in American homes aren’t working! And many homes that do have smoke detector still don’t have enough to be properly protected!

Smoke detectors can save even more lives if we install them everywhere they are needed and if we keep them working.

Minimum protection requires a smoke detector outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement. On floors without bedrooms, detectors should be installed in or near living areas such as dens, living rooms, or family rooms.

Placement of smoke detectors is important, because smoke rises, mount detectors high on a wall or on the ceiling.  A wall mounted unit should be 4 to 12 inches from the ceiling.  A ceiling mounted detector should be at least 4 inches from the nearest wall.  In a room with a pitched ceiling, mount the detector on or near the ceiling highest point.

In open stairways with no doors at the top or bottom, position smoke detectors anywhere in the path of smoke moving up the stairs.  But always position smoke detectors at the bottom of enclosed stairways, such as those leading to the basement, because dead air is trapped near the door at the top of the stairway could prevent smoke from reaching the detector.

Keep detectors away from windows, doors, or forced air registers where drafts could interfere with the detector’s operation.

Test your detector by following the manufacturer’s instructions, test detectors weekly.  Remember, only a working smoke detector can protect you. Remember to change the batteries twice a year, when the time changes from daylight saving to standard, and from standard to daylight saving.

Kids Corner

Children and Fire safety are very important. 

Place a fire detector in every room in the house (and on every floor), and be sure to check their batteries at least twice a
year (when you change the clocks for Daylight Savings).

Be sure that your children know what to do if a fire breaks out in your house, like how to escape your home. Have them
come up with an escape plan showing at least two exits from every room.

Always have at least two working Fire extinguishers! They could save your families life! Be sure to test them, and
have one on each floor of your house.

Hold Fire drills in your house. Be sure that your kids have an escape plan ready in case there is a fire. Be sure to show
them every route possible for exiting your house, including their bedroom window.

Fires can break out at any time of the day or night, so it's important that your family knows how to get
out of your house as many different places as possible. It is also important that your kids know how to
stop-drop-and roll in case their clothes catch on fire. And they should keep their doors closed at night
to help keep the fire from spreading into their rooms too quickly.

US Fire Administration for Kids

Sparky the Fire Dog Home Page