Home Apparatus Photos History Past Chiefs  
  Call Stats Fire Prevention Events Officers Links  
 

Serving the Borough of Wharton since 1904

 
Department History
 

 

In 1902 it was felt there was a need for a Fire Department, but nothing was done until the fall of 1903, when a group of citizens and property holders met at the school house to discuss the matter.
The objective of the meeting was to talk about entering into an agreement with Robert F. Oram to supply water from his water company for fire fighting purposes.
 

Present at the meeting were:
Charles M. Hance
Robert F. Oram
William Webber
Dr. H.W. Kice
Charles Pfiefer
 William Tyak
Joseph Kaiser
 George Farr
Dr. Daniel Walters
John McKenna
Car Bergt
 E. W. Rosevear


Since this was a formal meeting, Charles Hance was elected as committee Chairman, and E.W. Rosevear was elected secretary.
At this meeting definite proof was submitted showing the advantages to be derived from a reduction in insurance rates as soon as a fire department was established.
A committee was appointed to contact all property owners and get their cooperation in this proposed agreement.
At following meetings, this committee continued to bring the matter of forming the fire companies by ordinance before the common council.
After the original meeting, there were four meetings of this committee which was known as the "citizens committee interested in fire protection," and they were now being held in the council room.
At the third meeting, Dr. Kice was elected to serve as the new chairman and E. W. Rosevear continued as secretary. Also at this meeting, estimates were furnished on the cost of the required equipment and it was decided to assess the property holders in proportion to their assessed valuation to defray the cost of this equipment. And finally at this meeting, Mr. Oram offered to loan his hose carriages along with 500 feet of hose until the time when the committee could purchase one.
At the fourth meeting, a committee reported that they had been to New York City to inspect fire equipment and recommended the purchase of a used hand-truck for $325. A motion was made to put a $50.00 deposit on the hand-truck and Mr. Oram was instructed to place the order for the apparatus and necessary supplies.
And at the June 28, 1904 meeting, a final letter was drafted soliciting subscriptions, and arrangements to make final payment on the apparatus ordered.
While this "citizens committee was continued, the common council was busy drafting an ordinance with these significant dates:
Original ordinance drafted November 16, 1903, and referred to committee first reading December 21. 1903.  A second reading January 18, 1904.  A Third and final reading February 15, 1904.   At this February 15, 1904, the ordinance was declared law by Mayor Harry J. Williams.
The title of the ordinance was "ordinance to provide for, establish and regulate a fire department in the Borough of Wharton, and prescribing rules and the government thereof", and it was designated ordinance #52.
The ordinance designated a Chief, First Assistant Chief, and Second Assistant Chief. The fire department would be composed of three companies. The three companies would be called the Active Hose Company with twenty members, the Independent Hook and Ladder Company with forty members, and the Board of Fire Wardens composed of twenty members.
The fire department was not a reality until Borough Clerk William H. Force submitted to the council, a list of names, which were read and approved on April 4, 1904.
The name of Charles M. Hance was submitted and approved as the first Chief of the Wharton Fire Department. Robert f. Oram was approved as the first Assistant Chief, and John Mckenna was approved as the Second Assistant Chief. Thomas Champion was appointed as Foreman of the Hose Company, and William Somerville was appointed Assistant Foreman of the Hose Company. D.J. Kettrick was appointed Foreman of the Hook and Ladder Company, and Harry Hance the Assistant Foreman of the Hook and Ladder Company.
No reference was made to the Board of Fire Wardens at this meeting. Appointments were made to the Wardens on May 16, 1904, and the company organized on July 26, 1904. My source of information does not state who the first officers were.
The ordinance was amended on October 19, 1908 increasing the Hose Company membership to forty (40) men. The ordinance was amended again in 1968 increasing the Board of Fire Wardens membership to forty (40) men.
The list of the charter member of the Wharton Fire Department is attached at the end of the document.
Apparatus
The first apparatus were two (2), two wheeled, hand drawn hose carriages lent to the fire department by Mr. Robert Oram. Each was equipped with two hundred and fifty feet (250) of two and one half (2-1/2) inch hose.
Shortly here after, was the hose cart ordered by the "committee" and later this was augmented by a hand drawn "hook & ladder truck." this hook & ladder was outfitted with axes, lanterns, pike poles, pails, and a thirty (30) foot ladder.
Sometime later, around 1911, another two wheeled hose cart was added bringing the apparatus strength up to two hose carts, and one fully equipped hook & ladder truck, all hand- drawn of course.
The second hose cart was purchased in 1911, and because of it's high wheels, it was called the "jumper." Mr. Ed Hicks who as a charter member gave us this information. We still have and up until 1995, it was here in this room in the basement of the Wharton Public Library. In 1995, it was donated to the museum at the New Jersey Firemans Home in Booton, New Jersey where it today.
The next apparatus was a horse drawn hook and ladder truck with a running board which permitted some firemen to ride the vehicle, it had assorted ladders, and two thirty (30) gallon chemical tanks. This vehicle was drawn by a team of horses on loan from Oram's lumber & coal yard and Fichters livery.
The hand-drawn and hose-drawn apparatus finally gave way to the first gasoline motorized equipment when in 1916, a "REO" fire truck was purchased and placed in service. This apparatus had large solid rubber tires with wooden spoked wheels, a siren and bell, ladders, 2-1/2" hose with accessories, lanterns, and the two 30 gallon chemical tanks from the horse-drawn ladder truck.
This was followed in 1927 by a "Buffalo Pumper" which had a 500 gallon per minute pump, carried 650 feet of 2-1/2" hose and a booster tank. In 1949, it was outfitted with a windshield and an overhead bed, which carried a 3 section, 45 foot aluminum ladder.
In 1941, a "white" fire engine with a 500 gallon two (2) stage centrifugal pump and full compartments was purchased. It also carried 150 gallons of water in a booster tank.
In 1950, the Wharton Fire Department purchased a 1931 American La France salvage & rescue truck from Dover, and a 1927 American La France hook & ladder truck from Nutley. Since more time was spent repairing these last two pieces of apparatus than operating them, they did not stay around too long.
These were replaced in 1954 by a "Ward La France quadruple combination truck. This truck had a 750 gallon per minute pump, a 300 gallon booster tank, carried 1000 feet of 2-1/2" hose, and 300 feet of 1-1/2" hose. In addition it carried a 50 foot, 3 section ladder, a 28 foot 2 section ladder and various smaller ladders. This truck was a "jewel."
This "quad" was followed in 1955 by a Ward La France 750 gallon per minute pumper which carried 500 gallons of water in a booster tank, and carried 2000 feet of 2-1/2" hose and 600 feet of 1-1/2" hose.
Because two way radios were installed in these two vehicles, they were given apparatus numbers of engine 320 for the Ward La France pumper, and truck 321 for the Ward La France "quad."
In 1965 a "young" 1000 gallon per minute pumper was purchased which carried 500 gallons of water, and 2000 feet of 2-1/2" hose, 600 feet of 1-1/2" hose, one 28 foot, and one 14 foot aluminum ladder. This pumper was given the radio number of engine 322.
In 1973, the Ward La France pumper (engine 320) was replaced by another "young" 1000 gallon per minute pumper which was powered by a V6 Detroit Diesel. This pumper also carried 500 gallons of water, 2000 feet of 2-1/2" hose, 600 feet of 1- 1/2" hose, one 28 foot, and one 14 foot aluminum ladder. This pumper kept the radio number of engine 320.
In 1976, it was felt that there was a need for a fire chief's vehicle. The first Chief's vehicle purchased was a 1970 Nash Rambler. It was equipped with a red light bar, siren, and two way radio. This chief's car was purchased by and owned by the Fire Department, not the Borough of Wharton. At present, the fire Chiefs vehicle is a 1997 Jeep Cherokee.
In 1977, the Ward La France "quad" was replaced by a 75 foot Pierce-Pittman Snorkel. In addition to the 75 foot articulating boom, the snorkel has a 1000 gallon per minute pump, carries 2000 feet of 3" hose, 300 feet of 2-1/2" hose. The ladders consist of a 3 section 40 foot ladder, a 2 section 32 foot ladder, and 6 smaller ladders, all aluminum.
In 1987, a Pierce 1250 gallon per minute pumper was purchased, replacing the 1964 Young pumper. This engine has a 500 gallon of water in it's tank and carries 2000 feet of 3 inch hose, 300 feet of 1-3/4 inch hose, on 26 foot extension ladder, and one 14 foot roof ladder. This engine has the radio number of engine 322.
In 1996, another pierce 1250 gallon per minute pumper was purchased to replace the 1973 Young Deisel pumper. This engine has a 750 gallon water tank, carries 2000 feet of 3" hose and 600 feet of 1-3/4" hose. The ladders are a 24 foot two section ladder and a 12 foot roof ladder. This engine has been assigned the radio number of engine 320.
Today our compliment of fire apparatus consists of:
1996 Pierce engine 320 1250 gpm pumper
1977 Pierce truck 321 1000 gpm 75 foot snorkel ladder truck
1987 Pierce engine 322 1250 gpm pumper
1991 Dodge truck 323 utility vehicle
1990 Ford truck 324 pick-up vehicle
1997 Jeep car 327, chief's car
Alarm system
The first method of alerting the firemen was by means of striking large locomotive rims located in several sections of town.
Then in December 1904, a 8 inch steam whistle was installed at the Hurd Mine. After the mine was closed, the whistle was transferred to the furnace and then to the Gunther Silk Mill, and in 1918, a manually controlled electric siren was installed in a cupola atop the borough hall.
In 1929, the first of 19 sterling system street fire alarm boxes were installed through the borough. As the population of the town increased during the 1950's, two additional electric sirens were installed (one in Luxemburg and one in St.Mary's) to help alert the firemen in these sections of the borough. One more electric siren was added to the woodland section in 1955.
The Saturday noon fire alarm system test dates back to the action of the borough council requiring a test of the fire alarm as early as December 26, 1904.
Through the years additional street alarm boxes were added and when the system was finally removed in 1981, there were a total of 41 alarm boxes and four sirens. Why were the alarm boxes removed? It was due to maintenance expenses and the high number of false alarms we were receiving.
Today we still have the four (4) sirens, but the fire department is dispatched by home radio receivers and personal pagers. The sirens are activated by radio tones as are the home receivers and pagers.
Parades
The Wharton Fire Department has always been known for it's marching ability and drill team. The first parade attended in dress uniform was at Hackettestown in August 29, 1907. No mention was made of receiving any prizes.
The first prize dates back to 1908 and through out the years, we have appeared throughout NJ, NY and Pa. Today over 200 trophies adorn the walls of our meeting room, recreation room and truckroom. The oldest trophy we have dates back to 1908. The inscription on the trophy states that it was awarded to the Hook and Ladder Company for running 1000 yards and extinguishing a fire in 1 minute and 20 seconds. I believe that it should state 100 yards.
The original uniforms of 1906 were the long coat, red flannel lined variety with square peaked hats. In 1916, the second uniforms were purchased with round peaked hats.
In 1935, the New York Fire Department officers uniform style was adopted and we still have this style today.
In 1952, the chief officers hats were modified by changing from blue to white crown.
 

Charter members Active Hose Company No. 1
Wharton Fire Department
April 11, 1904
Thomas Champion, Foreman Wm. Hitchens
Wm H. Somerville, Assist foreman Joseph Schiffne
Wm. H. Force Wallace Fitcher
James Saundry Ed Williams
Henry Wilcox Thomas H. Rowe
Ed R. King John Saundry Jr.
George Lewis W. J. Chegwidden
James Lewis Frank Singleton
Joseph Tregenza Charles Mohler
Chas. Mclaughlin John Cole
P. K. Flannaga
 

Charter members Independent Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1
Wharton Fire Department
April 11, 1904
Daniel Kettrick Foreman Frank Spargo
Harry Hance, Assist. Foreman Agustus Mathews
Fred Kernick Martin Morris
Edward Hicks Jr. Frank Guest
Agustus Stephens William Rusch
John Hitchens Martin Carberry
Noal Wilcox Thomas Wilcox
Wm. Rosewaren Frank King
J. J. Huff William Kennedy
Joseph K. Williams William Dorman
 

Charter members Board of Fire Wardens
Wharton Fire Department
July 26, 1904
A. M. Ryan Michael Kennedy
James T. Spargo Williams Foley
Richard S. Hart W. H. Whitham
E. W. Rosevear Joseph Mankee
Dr. H. W. Kice John Kernick

Information source:
Wharton Fire Department 50th Anniversary souvenir program
Leonard a. Williams, member 1957 to present.
August 28, 2000.

 
Department History
 
 
   
 

 

   
   
 
  Home Apparatus Photos History Past Chiefs  
  Call Stats Fire Prevention Events Officers Links  
 

Serving the Borough of Wharton since 1904

 
Department History
 

 

In 1902 it was felt there was a need for a Fire Department, but nothing was done until the fall of 1903, when a group of citizens and property holders met at the school house to discuss the matter.
The objective of the meeting was to talk about entering into an agreement with Robert F. Oram to supply water from his water company for fire fighting purposes.
 

Present at the meeting were:
Charles M. Hance
Robert F. Oram
William Webber
Dr. H.W. Kice
Charles Pfiefer
 William Tyak
Joseph Kaiser
 George Farr
Dr. Daniel Walters
John McKenna
Car Bergt
 E. W. Rosevear


Since this was a formal meeting, Charles Hance was elected as committee Chairman, and E.W. Rosevear was elected secretary.
At this meeting definite proof was submitted showing the advantages to be derived from a reduction in insurance rates as soon as a fire department was established.
A committee was appointed to contact all property owners and get their cooperation in this proposed agreement.
At following meetings, this committee continued to bring the matter of forming the fire companies by ordinance before the common council.
After the original meeting, there were four meetings of this committee which was known as the "citizens committee interested in fire protection," and they were now being held in the council room.
At the third meeting, Dr. Kice was elected to serve as the new chairman and E. W. Rosevear continued as secretary. Also at this meeting, estimates were furnished on the cost of the required equipment and it was decided to assess the property holders in proportion to their assessed valuation to defray the cost of this equipment. And finally at this meeting, Mr. Oram offered to loan his hose carriages along with 500 feet of hose until the time when the committee could purchase one.
At the fourth meeting, a committee reported that they had been to New York City to inspect fire equipment and recommended the purchase of a used hand-truck for $325. A motion was made to put a $50.00 deposit on the hand-truck and Mr. Oram was instructed to place the order for the apparatus and necessary supplies.
And at the June 28, 1904 meeting, a final letter was drafted soliciting subscriptions, and arrangements to make final payment on the apparatus ordered.
While this "citizens committee was continued, the common council was busy drafting an ordinance with these significant dates:
Original ordinance drafted November 16, 1903, and referred to committee first reading December 21. 1903.  A second reading January 18, 1904.  A Third and final reading February 15, 1904.   At this February 15, 1904, the ordinance was declared law by Mayor Harry J. Williams.
The title of the ordinance was "ordinance to provide for, establish and regulate a fire department in the Borough of Wharton, and prescribing rules and the government thereof", and it was designated ordinance #52.
The ordinance designated a Chief, First Assistant Chief, and Second Assistant Chief. The fire department would be composed of three companies. The three companies would be called the Active Hose Company with twenty members, the Independent Hook and Ladder Company with forty members, and the Board of Fire Wardens composed of twenty members.
The fire department was not a reality until Borough Clerk William H. Force submitted to the council, a list of names, which were read and approved on April 4, 1904.
The name of Charles M. Hance was submitted and approved as the first Chief of the Wharton Fire Department. Robert f. Oram was approved as the first Assistant Chief, and John Mckenna was approved as the Second Assistant Chief. Thomas Champion was appointed as Foreman of the Hose Company, and William Somerville was appointed Assistant Foreman of the Hose Company. D.J. Kettrick was appointed Foreman of the Hook and Ladder Company, and Harry Hance the Assistant Foreman of the Hook and Ladder Company.
No reference was made to the Board of Fire Wardens at this meeting. Appointments were made to the Wardens on May 16, 1904, and the company organized on July 26, 1904. My source of information does not state who the first officers were.
The ordinance was amended on October 19, 1908 increasing the Hose Company membership to forty (40) men. The ordinance was amended again in 1968 increasing the Board of Fire Wardens membership to forty (40) men.
The list of the charter member of the Wharton Fire Department is attached at the end of the document.
Apparatus
The first apparatus were two (2), two wheeled, hand drawn hose carriages lent to the fire department by Mr. Robert Oram. Each was equipped with two hundred and fifty feet (250) of two and one half (2-1/2) inch hose.
Shortly here after, was the hose cart ordered by the "committee" and later this was augmented by a hand drawn "hook & ladder truck." this hook & ladder was outfitted with axes, lanterns, pike poles, pails, and a thirty (30) foot ladder.
Sometime later, around 1911, another two wheeled hose cart was added bringing the apparatus strength up to two hose carts, and one fully equipped hook & ladder truck, all hand- drawn of course.
The second hose cart was purchased in 1911, and because of it's high wheels, it was called the "jumper." Mr. Ed Hicks who as a charter member gave us this information. We still have and up until 1995, it was here in this room in the basement of the Wharton Public Library. In 1995, it was donated to the museum at the New Jersey Firemans Home in Booton, New Jersey where it today.
The next apparatus was a horse drawn hook and ladder truck with a running board which permitted some firemen to ride the vehicle, it had assorted ladders, and two thirty (30) gallon chemical tanks. This vehicle was drawn by a team of horses on loan from Oram's lumber & coal yard and Fichters livery.
The hand-drawn and hose-drawn apparatus finally gave way to the first gasoline motorized equipment when in 1916, a "REO" fire truck was purchased and placed in service. This apparatus had large solid rubber tires with wooden spoked wheels, a siren and bell, ladders, 2-1/2" hose with accessories, lanterns, and the two 30 gallon chemical tanks from the horse-drawn ladder truck.
This was followed in 1927 by a "Buffalo Pumper" which had a 500 gallon per minute pump, carried 650 feet of 2-1/2" hose and a booster tank. In 1949, it was outfitted with a windshield and an overhead bed, which carried a 3 section, 45 foot aluminum ladder.
In 1941, a "white" fire engine with a 500 gallon two (2) stage centrifugal pump and full compartments was purchased. It also carried 150 gallons of water in a booster tank.
In 1950, the Wharton Fire Department purchased a 1931 American La France salvage & rescue truck from Dover, and a 1927 American La France hook & ladder truck from Nutley. Since more time was spent repairing these last two pieces of apparatus than operating them, they did not stay around too long.
These were replaced in 1954 by a "Ward La France quadruple combination truck. This truck had a 750 gallon per minute pump, a 300 gallon booster tank, carried 1000 feet of 2-1/2" hose, and 300 feet of 1-1/2" hose. In addition it carried a 50 foot, 3 section ladder, a 28 foot 2 section ladder and various smaller ladders. This truck was a "jewel."
This "quad" was followed in 1955 by a Ward La France 750 gallon per minute pumper which carried 500 gallons of water in a booster tank, and carried 2000 feet of 2-1/2" hose and 600 feet of 1-1/2" hose.
Because two way radios were installed in these two vehicles, they were given apparatus numbers of engine 320 for the Ward La France pumper, and truck 321 for the Ward La France "quad."
In 1965 a "young" 1000 gallon per minute pumper was purchased which carried 500 gallons of water, and 2000 feet of 2-1/2" hose, 600 feet of 1-1/2" hose, one 28 foot, and one 14 foot aluminum ladder. This pumper was given the radio number of engine 322.
In 1973, the Ward La France pumper (engine 320) was replaced by another "young" 1000 gallon per minute pumper which was powered by a V6 Detroit Diesel. This pumper also carried 500 gallons of water, 2000 feet of 2-1/2" hose, 600 feet of 1- 1/2" hose, one 28 foot, and one 14 foot aluminum ladder. This pumper kept the radio number of engine 320.
In 1976, it was felt that there was a need for a fire chief's vehicle. The first Chief's vehicle purchased was a 1970 Nash Rambler. It was equipped with a red light bar, siren, and two way radio. This chief's car was purchased by and owned by the Fire Department, not the Borough of Wharton. At present, the fire Chiefs vehicle is a 1997 Jeep Cherokee.
In 1977, the Ward La France "quad" was replaced by a 75 foot Pierce-Pittman Snorkel. In addition to the 75 foot articulating boom, the snorkel has a 1000 gallon per minute pump, carries 2000 feet of 3" hose, 300 feet of 2-1/2" hose. The ladders consist of a 3 section 40 foot ladder, a 2 section 32 foot ladder, and 6 smaller ladders, all aluminum.
In 1987, a Pierce 1250 gallon per minute pumper was purchased, replacing the 1964 Young pumper. This engine has a 500 gallon of water in it's tank and carries 2000 feet of 3 inch hose, 300 feet of 1-3/4 inch hose, on 26 foot extension ladder, and one 14 foot roof ladder. This engine has the radio number of engine 322.
In 1996, another pierce 1250 gallon per minute pumper was purchased to replace the 1973 Young Deisel pumper. This engine has a 750 gallon water tank, carries 2000 feet of 3" hose and 600 feet of 1-3/4" hose. The ladders are a 24 foot two section ladder and a 12 foot roof ladder. This engine has been assigned the radio number of engine 320.
Today our compliment of fire apparatus consists of:
1996 Pierce engine 320 1250 gpm pumper
1977 Pierce truck 321 1000 gpm 75 foot snorkel ladder truck
1987 Pierce engine 322 1250 gpm pumper
1991 Dodge truck 323 utility vehicle
1990 Ford truck 324 pick-up vehicle
1997 Jeep car 327, chief's car
Alarm system
The first method of alerting the firemen was by means of striking large locomotive rims located in several sections of town.
Then in December 1904, a 8 inch steam whistle was installed at the Hurd Mine. After the mine was closed, the whistle was transferred to the furnace and then to the Gunther Silk Mill, and in 1918, a manually controlled electric siren was installed in a cupola atop the borough hall.
In 1929, the first of 19 sterling system street fire alarm boxes were installed through the borough. As the population of the town increased during the 1950's, two additional electric sirens were installed (one in Luxemburg and one in St.Mary's) to help alert the firemen in these sections of the borough. One more electric siren was added to the woodland section in 1955.
The Saturday noon fire alarm system test dates back to the action of the borough council requiring a test of the fire alarm as early as December 26, 1904.
Through the years additional street alarm boxes were added and when the system was finally removed in 1981, there were a total of 41 alarm boxes and four sirens. Why were the alarm boxes removed? It was due to maintenance expenses and the high number of false alarms we were receiving.
Today we still have the four (4) sirens, but the fire department is dispatched by home radio receivers and personal pagers. The sirens are activated by radio tones as are the home receivers and pagers.
Parades
The Wharton Fire Department has always been known for it's marching ability and drill team. The first parade attended in dress uniform was at Hackettestown in August 29, 1907. No mention was made of receiving any prizes.
The first prize dates back to 1908 and through out the years, we have appeared throughout NJ, NY and Pa. Today over 200 trophies adorn the walls of our meeting room, recreation room and truckroom. The oldest trophy we have dates back to 1908. The inscription on the trophy states that it was awarded to the Hook and Ladder Company for running 1000 yards and extinguishing a fire in 1 minute and 20 seconds. I believe that it should state 100 yards.
The original uniforms of 1906 were the long coat, red flannel lined variety with square peaked hats. In 1916, the second uniforms were purchased with round peaked hats.
In 1935, the New York Fire Department officers uniform style was adopted and we still have this style today.
In 1952, the chief officers hats were modified by changing from blue to white crown.
 

Charter members Active Hose Company No. 1
Wharton Fire Department
April 11, 1904
Thomas Champion, Foreman Wm. Hitchens
Wm H. Somerville, Assist foreman Joseph Schiffne
Wm. H. Force Wallace Fitcher
James Saundry Ed Williams
Henry Wilcox Thomas H. Rowe
Ed R. King John Saundry Jr.
George Lewis W. J. Chegwidden
James Lewis Frank Singleton
Joseph Tregenza Charles Mohler
Chas. Mclaughlin John Cole
P. K. Flannaga
 

Charter members Independent Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1
Wharton Fire Department
April 11, 1904
Daniel Kettrick Foreman Frank Spargo
Harry Hance, Assist. Foreman Agustus Mathews
Fred Kernick Martin Morris
Edward Hicks Jr. Frank Guest
Agustus Stephens William Rusch
John Hitchens Martin Carberry
Noal Wilcox Thomas Wilcox
Wm. Rosewaren Frank King
J. J. Huff William Kennedy
Joseph K. Williams William Dorman
 

Charter members Board of Fire Wardens
Wharton Fire Department
July 26, 1904
A. M. Ryan Michael Kennedy
James T. Spargo Williams Foley
Richard S. Hart W. H. Whitham
E. W. Rosevear Joseph Mankee
Dr. H. W. Kice John Kernick

Information source:
Wharton Fire Department 50th Anniversary souvenir program
Leonard a. Williams, member 1957 to present.
August 28, 2000.